Tag Archives: eco

Green Collar Jobs

As the green industry is growing, there are jobs available even in these economic times. While other areas of industry are suffering, green careers seem to be the new wave of the future. This is great because it’s predicted that green jobs are going to be sustainable as many more people are getting involved in conservation and going green. In this era of the green economy these are the job that are projected to be in high demand:

1. Solar Power Installer

Much of our energy is now being harvested from the sun. After being proven incredibly effective, solar power is becoming much more prominent and many places are making the switch to save money. So anyone going into construction might consider specializing in installing solar-thermal water heaters and rooftop photovoltaic cells as they are in increasing demand.

2. Conservation Biologist

The direction of our education is steadily becoming more focused on the sciences as that is the direction our economy is heading. If you majored in science in college, you could be a great conservation biologist. There is a renewal in the desire to preserve the environment, so there is a growing demand for scientists who are knowledgeable and willing to study and work with ecosystems and wildlife.  This will also open opportunities to teach or participate in research.

3. Urban Planner

As the urban aspect of environmentalism is the focus of this blog, the job of urban planner needs to be included. Urban planners are key to lowering America’s carbon footprint.Urban planners are responsible for designing metropolises so the flow of potential problems, many of the environmental like garbage and flooding, is limited. Employment in this sector is projected to grow 15 percent by 2016.

 

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DIY Compost Pile

Last week I wrote about how you can actually use egg shells in your compost pile, but then I realized I haven’t written anything about starting a compost pile. It’s actually really simple and really effective if you like to garden. You can even start a compost bin in an apartment. Here’s how you get started:

1. Get a bin

You can actually just make a compost pile an actual pile, but everyone recommends getting a bin for the sake of neatness and organization. Also if you plan on composting food scraps, it’s better for keeping the animals away. Below is what a typical compost bin looks like:

This commercial bin stacks for easy turning.

Ideally, you’ll want a bin that is about a cubic yard, but you can work with one that’s smaller.

2. Green, brown and everything in between

A good mixture of green and brown scraps is recommended. Green scraps such as grass trimmings, young weeds and comfrey leaves provide nitrogen to the pile and generates heat. Brown scraps are high in carbon and add fiber. You can use dead plants, autumn leaves and even cardboard to give this kick to your compost. Coffee grounds, hair and paper towels can also be composted, but use these items sparingly.

Make sure you mix everything in the bin really well too. You want to layer it so it’s even and there’s no compact areas of green or brown. Depending on the materials you have available either do a mixture of 3 parts brown to 1 part green, or half and half. Use a pitchfork or a shovel to turn your pile once a week to ensure the mixture keeps decomposing.

3. Maintain

Like I said above, you need to turn the pile once a week. This keeps the air flowing through the pile to help the  anaerobic decomposition. But you also want to keep the pile damp. Depending on the weather where you live, you might need to add water to it. The temperature is important also. The best way to test temperature is to feel the top of the pile. If it’s warm or hot, the compost pile is working. If not, just add more green material high in nitrogen.

4. Don’ts of Composting

Try to avoid composting bread, nuts, pasta or cooked food. They don’t break down well and cause your compost to turn slimy. Also out of health and safety reasons, never try to compost meat, bones, plastic, oil, fats, human or animal waste (ew) or magazines.

Give it some time then harvest it. You have been successfully sustainable!

A Victory for Urban Farming

Cincinnati might not be the first city that comes to mind when someone thinks of urban sustainability, but there are many in this city who fight for conservation issues. Permaganic Co., a nonprofit based in Over-the-Rhine that has operated the city’s Eco Garden since 2010, is an organization committed to not only urban sustainability, but also community involvement and the city’s youth.

The Eco Garden sits at 1718 Main St. in Over-the-Rhine. While the urban garden is used by Permaganic, they don’t own the garden’s property. The city of Cincinnati does. In a clash between continued development in the inner city of Cincinnati, and preservation of the community, the Eco Garden’s land was targeted for CitiRama, a program launched last year to encourage urban development.

The city contacted Angela Stanbery-Ebner, who, along with her husband, Luke, runs Permaganic, in February telling her not to plant at the Main Street garden this year.

After being in operation since 1998, the garden has provided produce for Findlay Market as well as giving the urban neighborhood’s youth a chance to learn how to grow their own fruit and vegetables. In a neighborhood that is often mentioned for the amount of crime, the Eco Garden fosters a sense of community. The land is a miniature farm, an ecosystem in its own right.

The city proposed to move the garden to a different plot of land, but it’s not so simple to transport that many plants who have been rooted on Main Street for so long.

After reaching out for help through petitions and contacting city council, Permaganic received support from city council member, Laure Quinlivan who has long been a supporter of both urban development and making Cincinnati greener. Quinlivan filed a motion and argued that the longest-running urban agriculture program in Cincinnati added to the quality of life in Over the Rhine, gave the community access to local produce and gave teenagers the opportunity to get involved.

After a Livable Communities committee meeting on March 12, the Eco Garden was saved from demolition. CitiRama was forced to find another site to build on and Stanbery-Ebner received the go-ahead from the city to start planting again.

And they all lived happily ever after….for the most part. In a Facebook update Permaganic said, “We are still hoping for long-term permanency…Laure Quinlivan tweeted “We saved this”…I don’t want to read too much into her comment, but we are REALLY hoping City Council will back us again if another development, or anything involving our lease, come up in future…”

Moral of the story? Urban development is not a bad thing; it’s actually a really, really good thing. But when it threatens such a great agricultural project that provides fresh, local produce to an under-served community and offers a place where the community can grow (pun intended), it becomes a hindrance rather than a help. We need to remember that organizations like Permaganic are progressing Cincinnati in the right direction in terms of not only sustainability, but also in community solidarity.